Collage of three anorak patterns: Kelly, Minoru, and Lonetree.

Along with stirring up autumn leaves, the nippy fall breeze also has brought us anorak patterns!

This autumn, there are two new anorak pattern releases on the indie sewing scene: Kelly, from Closet Case Patterns, and Lonetree, the first solo pattern from Indiesew co-founder, Allie Olson. These two fresh jacket patterns join Sewaholic’s beloved Minoru, released in 2011.

Following is a down-and-dirty comparison of these three indie pattern company anoraks: Kelly, Lonetree, and Minoru. Check out their features, and decide which jacket sewing pattern matches your stitching skills and personal style!

Kelly by Closet Case Patterns

Technical drawing of the Kelly anorak pattern.

Fabric

Recommendations for medium-weight woven fabrics include gabardine, cotton twill, stretch cotton twill, linen, rayon lycra, brushed nylon twill, rayon, nylon twill, waxed cotton, mercerized cotton twill, and stretch linen twill.

Waterproof fabric?

Try waterproofing cotton twill with a coat of Otter Wax. Also recommended is applying seam sealant to stitch lines. Other waterproof/weather-resistant options include Gore-Tex, waterproof twill, and ripstop.

Design options

Kelly has two views. View A has a three-piece hood and a drawstring waist. View B has a classic stand-up collar and no drawstring waist.

Hood

Yes!

Pockets

Kelly offers oversized, three-dimensional gusset pockets that allow you to leave your purse at home, according to designer Heather Lou. Plus, the pocket opening is at a sassy angle for added visual interest.

Notions beyond thread

Light- to medium-weight interfacing, metal snap buttons, separating coat zipper, and drawstring cord. Optional: double-fold bias tape to finish neckline and hem, grommets.

Kit?

Nab a Kelly hardware kit from Closet Case Patterns.

Tutorials

Closet Case Files has a blog post about Kelly anorak fabric options. The pattern maker isn’t planning a formal sewalong for Kelly, but you can expect blog posts about some of the trickier bits: sewing the zipper placket, making gusseted pockets, and installing snaps and grommets. Here’s the schedule of posts about the Kelly anorak.

What makes it a winner

The split cuff makes it easy to roll up your sleeves, which looks cool and is a nice option during sometimes steamy transitional weather. The hood is generous and won’t smoosh your hair. The hem covers your butt, which is nice on breezy fall or spring days (especially when you’re rocking leggings as pants (no judgment)).

Real talk

If I were to make the hoodless view, I’d add the drawstring waist. The lack of waist definition in View B reminds me of a fireman’s jacket. The split cuffs will require meticulous pressing for a professional look.

Click here to discover more about Closet Case Patterns’ Kelly anorak.

Lonetree by Allie Olson

Technical drawing of the Lonetree anorak pattern.

Fabric

Sew Lonetree with midweight wovens — corduroy, twill, chino. Wovens with a touch of stretch (less than 20 percent) are nice, too. If you’re playing the numbers game, aim for a woven that’s 7-10 ounces per square yard (how’s that for precision?). If you use a heavier fabric (such as waxed canvas), skip the interfacing.

Waterproof fabric?

There’s nothing explicit about making the anorak pattern with a waterproof/weatherproof fabric. Indiesew, which also sells fabric, does suggest emerald waterproof canvas as an option.

Design options

Lonetree has two views: View A, a jacket with a hood or View B, a hoodless vest.

Hood

Gotcha covered!

Pockets

Lonetree features four patch pockets with flaps — two on the chest and two on the hips.

Notions beyond thread

Twill tape, snaps, zipper. Optional: buttons, cording.

Kit?

Here’s where you can get a Lonetree kit. Anyone who’s already bought the pattern will be emailed a 15 percent coupon code for a kit, per this Lonetree blog post.

Tutorials

Here’s a blog post on fit and fabric choice, and here’s a blog post on Lonetree pattern testers. The Indiesew blog promises posts on hacks for Lonetree. The anorak pattern is part of Indiesew’s 2016 Fall/Winter Collection, and, should you be interested, there’s a blog hop around these patterns.

What makes it a winner

I love how the zipper is a strong design element in this sewing pattern! You could have fun by inserting a zipper in a contrasting color. And in my book, the more pockets, the better.

Real talk

Chest pockets over the boobs sometimes get weird. Experiment with placement before making a pocket commitment. If you want full booty coverage, it looks like you’d have to extend the hem. (But maybe a shorter hem works better for your body’s proportions!)

Click here to discover more about Allie Olson’s Lonetree jacket.

Minoru by Sewaholic

Technical drawing of the Minoru anorak pattern.

Fabric

Sew a Minoru in light to medium woven fabrics, such as cotton twill or canvas. Sewaholic delivers tons of fabric suggestions: denim, corduroy, velvet, velveteen, tweed, wool, linen, sweatshirt knits, or polar fleece. The jacket is lined; poly lining, mesh, cotton prints (if you’d like to add more personality to your jacket), fleece, flannel, or Kasha lining (a poly lining with a brushed back) are options.

Waterproof fabric?

There’s nothing explicit about waterproof/weatherproof fabric on the back of the envelope. A Sewaholic blog post about fabric options suggests making Minoru in nylon.

Design options

Minoru has two views. View A includes a hood that tucks into an oversized collar. View B omits the hood.

Hood

You betcha! When you don’t need the hood, it zips away into the collar.

Pockets

The pattern features internal patch pockets with optional Velcro closures. There are no external pockets for this anorak pattern, but there are a bunch of bloggers who’ve customized Minoru with additional hard-working pockets.

Notions beyond thread

2-inch elastic, fusible interfacing, separating zipper, closed zipper (for storing the hood in the collar in View A). Optional: Velcro.

Kits

You can find a Minoru jacket kit on Craftsy.

Tutorials

Get started with a multi-part Minoru sew-along, which covers, among many topics, why the jacket isn’t great for plaid fabric; fabric recommendations; and how to make a full-bust adjustment. And because this pattern has been around for a while, there are TONS of online sewists sharing tips and tricks for Minoru. #inspo

What makes it a winner

I’m a sucker for the hideaway hood. The oversized collar is dramatic and functional, blocking your face from cold and rain. I’m also fascinated by the raglan sleeves, which are easier to sew than their set-in counterparts. I also love, love, love lined garments; the extra mass feels luxurious.

Real talk

If I were to make a Minoru, I’d add external pockets. I need a place to stash gloves, my phone, tissues, used tissues from my children, etc. This side-seam pocket tutorial for Minoru looks very promising.

Click here to discover more about Sewaholic’s Minoru jacket.

Sewing an anorak pattern

Over to you, fair readers: Which of these jacket sewing patterns most appeals to you? Which anorak features rock your world? And what other anorak patterns have caught your eye? Please sound off in comments!

P.S. If you like this guide, check out more sewing advice from yours truly:

Sewing tips: 12 sewing truths for rookie sewists
Swimwear sewing tips: 8 can’t-miss resources in one place
How to survive a long-term sewing project